What are the signs of a termite infection?

The most common type of damage that termites are known to cause to homes are that of wood damage. Wood, being a rich source of energy (as demonstrated when wood is burnt), is of considerable importance to termites.

However, termites do not only damage wood. They damage any cellulostic materials, such as wood, carpets and paper. If you see any of these signs in your home, it could be a sign of a termite infection. However, just relying on this as a sign of infection is not a good method. Usually, this method can only rely on when some serious damage has been done. If other signs were looked out for earlier, the infection could have been prevented.

Here are other signs of infection to look out for:

Discarded wings

As discussed in the page about the termite life cycle, when the time for mating comes, alate termites will fly out into the open en masse towards any light source, and then fall to the ground, shedding their wings in the process. If you see discarded wings in your home, it could be that of alate termites.

Mud tubes

Subterranean termites build tunnels called mud tubes, which consist of tiny piece of soil, wood and debris. They use these tunnels to transport themselves between their colonies and food sources. So if you see any of these, it means they’re using your home as a food source. Heed it as a sign of infection.

Termite droppings

Because termites do not have the luxury of plumbing (can you think of any animals that do?), they often leave behind droppings such as those shown above on infested structures such as wood. If you see these droppings, it usually means there is a termite infection in your home.