Termites, often called the silent destroyer may be secretly living in your homeor yard without any immediate signs of damage. Termites consume cellulose-based plant materials. Unfortunately, all homes, regardless of their construction type, can provide cellulosefoodfor termite infestation.

Common Types

There are three major types of termites found in Jamaica: subterranean, drywood, and arboreal. They all belong to the phylum Arthropoda, the class Insecta, and the order Isoptera. There are over 2,000 different species, which all have distinct scientific names.

Appearance

Termites range from 1/4 to 1/2 an inch in length. The queens and kings are larger, capable of reaching over one inch long. The workers are typically soft-bodied and pale-colored. Flying termites, also called reproductives, have two pairs of prominent wings.

Diet

Termites are detritivores; they feed on dead plants and trees and get nutrients from cellulose, an organic fiber found in wood and plant matter. Wood makes up the majority of the pests diet, but they will eat other materials such as paper, plastic, and drywall. Most species prefer dead wood, but some termites feed on living trees.

A termites mouth is capable of tearing pieces of woody material. This causes major concern in human dwellings. House foundations, furniture, shelvesand evenbooks are all possible feeding sites for termites.

Habitat

Commonly, termites live in wooden structures, decayed trees, fallen timber, and soil. Habitats vary among species as some termites require different amounts of moisture

Subterranean termites are the most abundant variety and can be found throughout Jamaica. Subterranean termite homes are usually formed in soil. Within these mounds, termites build elaborate tunnel systems and mud tunnels through which they access above-ground food sources. Drywood termites live within the wood they consume and oftentimes infest walls and furniture.

When termites mature, winged swarmers may be seen around windows and doors. Swarmers are highly attracted to light and are most active in springtime. After mating, these termites locate a new breeding site and create another colony.

What Can You Do to Help Protect Your Home?

Since termites are a constant threat to your home, here are some things you can do during the year to help maintain the effectiveness of The Orkin Mans termite treatment plan. Small steps make a big difference in termite prevention and sustaining an effective termite treatment plan. Start by eliminating moisture conditions and termitefood around your home. These simple steps make your home a less attractive target, helping deter termites.

Eliminate Moisture Problems

Remove TermiteFood Sources

Termite Warning Signs & Identification

Some indications you may have a termite infestation:

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Termites – ORKIN Jamaica

This month, many homeowners will leave for work in the morning with everything in order, only to come home from work at the end of the day and find hundreds or thousands of subterranean termites flying and crawling all over their home. It can be a horrifying experience.

Spring is when we typically see large numbers of winged subterranean termites emerging inside homes. These termites swarm in order to disperse and start new colonies. Once a colony reaches a critical size (This usually takes 5-8 years), winged reproductives (kings and queens) are produced.

Swarming is usually triggered by warmer temperatures and rain. Youll see the winged termites emerge from the colony and start flying through the air. These termites are lousy fliers and they will quickly drop to the ground, shed their wings, pair off with a mate and attempt to begin a new colony.

Termite swarmers have a high mortality rate and only 3 percent survive. Those emerging from inside a structure almost never survive.

The presence of termite swarmers inside a home almost always indicates you have an infestation warranting treatment. You need to remember that just because you see them around windows, doors and lights; it doesnt necessarily mean termites are infesting that particular area. They are attracted to light and it is very important you keep in mind that their origin may be in other areas of the home.

Termite swarmers emerging from tree stumps, wood piles, fences and other outdoor locations does not always mean that your home is infested. However, it does indicate there are infestations near by and that you should have your home checked.

Another way you can spot a termite problem is when you see pencil-wide mud foraging tubes. A common place to spot these is in garages where they grow up out of cracks or joints in the slab and start climbing up the wall. You may also see them on the inside of your home around doors, windows, on walls or even hanging down from ceilings. Subterranean termites build these mud tunnels to provide access so they can travel back and forth from the ground and the structure.

Unfortunately, many homeowners will never know they have a subterranean termite problem until its too late. Thats because these termites will often work inside of walls and ceilings where they cant be seen.

Again, if you see swarming termites inside your home, it is a strong indication that you have an infestation. A thorough inspection of your home will need to be done to determine the origin of the infestation and then, you can determine the proper treatment needed to eradicate them.

Treatment of subterranean termites is done by injecting soil areas beneath the structure. Since subterranean termites live underground, it only makes sense to treat areas where they live. Many homeowners ask what happens to termites that are still in the homes frame work and how will they be affected if we only treat the soil located under the homes foundations. The answer to that is simple because, sooner or later, all of those termites will have to return back into the soil where they live. And, if treatment was done correctly, they will be exposed to treatment products that were put into the soil and will soon die off.

If your home needs treatment for subterranean termites, here are 3 key points to consider before doing any treatment on your home:

At Termite Terry Pest Control, Well Get Rid Of All Your Termites, Or Your Treatment Is Free! Have subterranean termite problems? Call our office at (949) 631-7348 or click on order formand well schedule an appointment at your convenience.

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Termite Inspections Orange County – Termite Terry Pest Control

This can be a funny question, but it is asked a lot. Yes, you can kill termites with bleach. Bleach will kill termites instantly, but it you will not be able to eliminate the bigger problem. You can kill the termites that you see, but you can’t get a hold of the entire colony with bleach. They breed and spread out fast.

If you have formosan or subterranean termites, you can’t access the colony or the queens at all. Not only that, they are very fast at destroying your home. So does bleach kill termites? yes, but not recommended. Call a professional and save your house.

Another reason why you shouldn’t use bleach as termiticide is because bleach is extremely dangerous to plant life. Bleach can generate toxins like dioxin to soil. When it happens, you will have no luck growing plants on that soil. Also, bleach can contaminate water source or water table.

Some people think bleach is organic because it comes from table salt. But it’s not organic. Bleach is created by spliting table salt into chlorine and caustic soda. As you may know, both chlorine and caustic soda are very dangerous substances. Bleach reacts with common household chemicals like ammonia and vinegar to produce deadly toxic gases. Not only that, it smells awful.

Chlorine, the main ingredient of bleach, is extremely harmful to soil’s health. If you apply bleach on soil to kill termites, you will end up killing all living organisms including earth worms. Once chlorine is spread out with rain, it will kill one plant at a time. It is just an awful way to kill ants and termites. Just don’t do it. Here is a screen shot of a forum post to show you what chlorine can do to your soil.

Read more here:
Does Bleach Kill Termites? – Termite Treatment Tips

About Termites About Termites

Termites cause over $ 5 billion damage in U.S. homes each year. One small termite colony of approximately 60,000 termites can eat a linear foot of a common 2×4 in just 5 months. In some regions of the United States, Formosan subterranean termite colonies typically number in millions and travel over 100 meter distance.

Subterranean termites causes over 90% of termite damage in the U.S. Colonies can contain several thousands to more than a million foragers. Some termites can chew through lead, plaster or mortar to find and eat wood. Almost 4 million U.S. homes are infested by termites each year.

Termites can be found in every state except Alaska. Termite queens live 15 to 25 years and can lay an egg every 15 seconds. There are thousands of termite species but can simply be divided into two types, non-subterranean (drywood termites and dampwood termites) and subterraneans.

Termites are cold blooded and therefore depend on their surrounding environment for warmth.

Drywood termites infest dry, undecayed wood, including structural lumber as well as dead limbs of native trees and shade orchard trees, utility poles, posts and lumber in storage. From these areas, winged reproductives seasonally migrate to nearby buildings and other structures usually on sunny days during fall months. Drywood termites are most prevalent in Southern California ( including the desert areas ), but also occur along most Coastal Regions and in the Central Valley.

Drywood termites have low moisture requirement and can tolerate dry conditions for prolonged periods. Studies showed that drywood termites are heat/temperature sensitive. They remain entirely above ground and do not connect their nests to the soil. Piles of their fecal pellets, which are distinctive in appearance, may be a clue to their presence. The fecal pellets are elongated (about 3/100 inch long) with rounded ends and have six flattened or roundly depressed surfaces separated by six longitudinal ridges. They vary considerably in color, but appear granular and salt and pepper like in color and appearance. Winged adults of western drywood termites are dark brown with smoky black wings and have a reddish brown head and thorax; wing veins are black. These insects are noticeably larger than subterranean termites.

Drywood termite treatment include whole structure application of fumigants or heat and localized or spot treatments of chemicals or treatments that use heat, freezing, microwaves, or electricity. Techniques to prevent infestations of this species include the use of chemicals, pressure treated wood, barriers and resistant woods.

When planning treatment of drywood termites consider whether the whole house structure is to be treated or just localized areas. Difficulty in determining the extent of a drywood termite infestation makes localized/spot treatments difficult to ensure complete control. There also appears to have considerable variations in the effectiveness of various techniques from applicator to applicator. Read your guarantee carefully; you may wish to consider an annual inspection service. Also important is a companys reputation. Obtain at least 3 vendor bids before you decide. Check the reliability of the vendor by asking for client referrals and check the status of its business license and consumer complaints with the California Structural Pest Control Board in Sacramento and with your local Better Business Bureau.Orange oil, borates and non-repellents are registered to control/exterminate drywood termites.

Subterranean termites require moist environments. To satisfy this need, they usually nest in or near the soil and maintain some connection with the soil through tunnels in wood or through shelter tubes they construct. These shelter tubes are made of soil with bits of wood or plasterboard (drywall). Much of the damage they cause occurs in foundations and structural support wood. Because of the moisture requirements of subterranean termites, they are often found in wood that has wood rot.

The western subterranean termite is the most destructive one found in California. Reproductive winged forms of subterranean termites are dark brown to brownish black, with brownish gray wings. On warm, sunny days following fall or sometimes spring rains, swarms of reproductives may be seen. Soldiers are wingless with white bodies and pale yellow heads. Their long, narrow heads have eyes. Workers are slightly smaller than reproductives, wingless, and have shorter head than soldiers; their color is similar to that of soldiers.

Subterranean termites structures cannot be adequately controlles by fumigation, heat treatment, freezing, or termite electrocution devices because the reproductives and nymphs are concentrated in nests near or below ground level in structures out of reach of these control methods. The primary methods of controlling these termites are the application of insecticides or baiting programs. Insecticides are applied to the soil either in drenches or by injection. Special hazards are involved with applying insecticides the soil around and under buildings and a licensed professional does these procedures best. Some strategies are pre construction, others are post construction treatments. Soil barrier treatments for the entire structure, or use of new technology products for the entire structure may be done. Foundation perimeter treatments are generally considered very efficacious at keeping subterranean termites out of structures. Local treatments are less efficacious. By law, companies must provide you with the following disclosure. Local treatment is not intended to be an entire structure treatment method. If infestations of wood destroying pests extend and exist beyond the area(s) of local treatment, they may not be exterminated.

Recently introduced chemicals (imidaloprid and fipronil) are now available that are less toxic to humans and other mammals than the older insecticides (repellent termiticides) but highly toxic to insects. Both of these insecticides are non repellent to termites and have been shown to be effective in killing termites at low dosage under Californias climatic conditions. Bora Care, a borate, is also effective and registered, as preconstruction treatment, against subterraneans. Generally, the most effective insecticides are only available to licensed structural pest control operators.

Termites cause over $ 5 billion damage in U.S. homes each year. One small termite colony of approximately 60,000 termites can eat a linear foot of a common 2×4 in just 5 months. In some regions of the United States, Formosan subterranean termite colonies typically number in millions and travel over 100 meter distance.

Subterranean termites causes over 90% of termite damage in the U.S. Colonies can contain several thousands to more than a million foragers. Some termites can chew through lead, plaster or mortar to find and eat wood. Almost 4 million U.S. homes are infested by termites each year.

Termites can be found in every state except Alaska. Termite queens live 15 to 25 years and can lay an egg every 15 seconds. There are thousands of termite species but can simply be divided into two types, non-subterranean (drywood termites and dampwood termites) and subterraneans.

Termites are col
d blooded and therefore depend on their surrounding environment for warmth.

Drywood termites infest dry, undecayed wood, including structural lumber as well as dead limbs of native trees and shade orchard trees, utility poles, posts and lumber in storage. From these areas, winged reproductives seasonally migrate to nearby buildings and other structures usually on sunny days during fall months. Drywood termites are most prevalent in Southern California ( including the desert areas ), but also occur along most Coastal Regions and in the Central Valley.

Drywood termites have low moisture requirement and can tolerate dry conditions for prolonged periods. Studies showed that drywood termites are heat/temperature sensitive. They remain entirely above ground and do not connect their nests to the soil. Piles of their fecal pellets, which are distinctive in appearance, may be a clue to their presence. The fecal pellets are elongated (about 3/100 inch long) with rounded ends and have six flattened or roundly depressed surfaces separated by six longitudinal ridges. They vary considerably in color, but appear granular and salt and pepper like in color and appearance. Winged adults of western drywood termites are dark brown with smoky black wings and have a reddish brown head and thorax; wing veins are black. These insects are noticeably larger than subterranean termites.

Drywood termite treatment include whole structure application of fumigants or heat and localized or spot treatments of chemicals or treatments that use heat, freezing, microwaves, or electricity. Techniques to prevent infestations of this species include the use of chemicals, pressure treated wood, barriers and resistant woods.

When planning treatment of drywood termites consider whether the whole house structure is to be treated or just localized areas. Difficulty in determining the extent of a drywood termite infestation makes localized/spot treatments difficult to ensure complete control. There also appears to have considerable variations in the effectiveness of various techniques from applicator to applicator. Read your guarantee carefully; you may wish to consider an annual inspection service. Also important is a companys reputation. Obtain at least 3 vendor bids before you decide. Check the reliability of the vendor by asking for client referrals and check the status of its business license and consumer complaints with the California Structural Pest Control Board in Sacramento and with your local Better Business Bureau.Orange oil, borates and non-repellents are registered to control/exterminate drywood termites.

Subterranean termites require moist environments. To satisfy this need, they usually nest in or near the soil and maintain some connection with the soil through tunnels in wood or through shelter tubes they construct. These shelter tubes are made of soil with bits of wood or plasterboard (drywall). Much of the damage they cause occurs in foundations and structural support wood. Because of the moisture requirements of subterranean termites, they are often found in wood that has wood rot.

The western subterranean termite is the most destructive one found in California. Reproductive winged forms of subterranean termites are dark brown to brownish black, with brownish gray wings. On warm, sunny days following fall or sometimes spring rains, swarms of reproductives may be seen. Soldiers are wingless with white bodies and pale yellow heads. Their long, narrow heads have eyes. Workers are slightly smaller than reproductives, wingless, and have shorter head than soldiers; their color is similar to that of soldiers.

Subterranean termites structures cannot be adequately controlles by fumigation, heat treatment, freezing, or termite electrocution devices because the reproductives and nymphs are concentrated in nests near or below ground level in structures out of reach of these control methods. The primary methods of controlling these termites are the application of insecticides or baiting programs. Insecticides are applied to the soil either in drenches or by injection. Special hazards are involved with applying insecticides the soil around and under buildings and a licensed professional does these procedures best. Some strategies are pre construction, others are post construction treatments. Soil barrier treatments for the entire structure, or use of new technology products for the entire structure may be done. Foundation perimeter treatments are generally considered very efficacious at keeping subterranean termites out of structures. Local treatments are less efficacious. By law, companies must provide you with the following disclosure. Local treatment is not intended to be an entire structure treatment method. If infestations of wood destroying pests extend and exist beyond the area(s) of local treatment, they may not be exterminated.

Recently introduced chemicals (imidaloprid and fipronil) are now available that are less toxic to humans and other mammals than the older insecticides (repellent termiticides) but highly toxic to insects. Both of these insecticides are non repellent to termites and have been shown to be effective in killing termites at low dosage under Californias climatic conditions. Bora Care, a borate, is also effective and registered, as preconstruction treatment, against subterraneans. Generally, the most effective insecticides are only available to licensed structural pest control operators.

Termites cause over $ 5 billion damage in U.S. homes each year. One small termite colony of approximately 60,000 termites can eat a linear foot of a common 2×4 in just 5 months. In some regions of the United States, Formosan subterranean termite colonies typically number in millions and travel over 100 meter distance.

Subterranean termites causes over 90% of termite damage in the U.S. Colonies can contain several thousands to more than a million foragers. Some termites can chew through lead, plaster or mortar to find and eat wood. Almost 4 million U.S. homes are infested by termites each year.

Termites can be found in every state except Alaska. Termite queens live 15 to 25 years and can lay an egg every 15 seconds. There are thousands of termite species but can simply be divided into two types, non-subterranean (drywood termites and dampwood termites) and subterraneans.

Termites are cold blooded and therefore depend on their surrounding environment for warmth.

Drywood termites infest dry, undecayed wood, including structural lumber as well as dead limbs of native trees and shade orchard trees, utility poles, posts and lumber in storage. From these areas, winged reproductives seasonally migrate to nearby buildings and other structures usually on sunny days during fall months. Drywood termites are most prevalent in Southern California ( including the desert areas ), but also occur along most Coastal Regions and in the Central Valley.

Drywood termites have low moisture requirement and can tolerate dry conditions for prolonged periods. Studies showed that drywood termites are heat/temperature sensitive. They remain entirely above ground and do not connect their nests to the soil. Piles of their fecal pellets, which are distinctive in appearance, may be a clue to their presence. The fecal pellets are elongated (about 3/100 inch long) with rounded ends and have six flat
tened or roundly depressed surfaces separated by six longitudinal ridges. They vary considerably in color, but appear granular and salt and pepper like in color and appearance. Winged adults of western drywood termites are dark brown with smoky black wings and have a reddish brown head and thorax; wing veins are black. These insects are noticeably larger than subterranean termites.

Drywood termite treatment include whole structure application of fumigants or heat and localized or spot treatments of chemicals or treatments that use heat, freezing, microwaves, or electricity. Techniques to prevent infestations of this species include the use of chemicals, pressure treated wood, barriers and resistant woods.

When planning treatment of drywood termites consider whether the whole house structure is to be treated or just localized areas. Difficulty in determining the extent of a drywood termite infestation makes localized/spot treatments difficult to ensure complete control. There also appears to have considerable variations in the effectiveness of various techniques from applicator to applicator. Read your guarantee carefully; you may wish to consider an annual inspection service. Also important is a companys reputation. Obtain at least 3 vendor bids before you decide. Check the reliability of the vendor by asking for client referrals and check the status of its business license and consumer complaints with the California Structural Pest Control Board in Sacramento and with your local Better Business Bureau.Orange oil, borates and non-repellents are registered to control/exterminate drywood termites.

Subterranean termites require moist environments. To satisfy this need, they usually nest in or near the soil and maintain some connection with the soil through tunnels in wood or through shelter tubes they construct. These shelter tubes are made of soil with bits of wood or plasterboard (drywall). Much of the damage they cause occurs in foundations and structural support wood. Because of the moisture requirements of subterranean termites, they are often found in wood that has wood rot.

The western subterranean termite is the most destructive one found in California. Reproductive winged forms of subterranean termites are dark brown to brownish black, with brownish gray wings. On warm, sunny days following fall or sometimes spring rains, swarms of reproductives may be seen. Soldiers are wingless with white bodies and pale yellow heads. Their long, narrow heads have eyes. Workers are slightly smaller than reproductives, wingless, and have shorter head than soldiers; their color is similar to that of soldiers.

Subterranean termites structures cannot be adequately controlles by fumigation, heat treatment, freezing, or termite electrocution devices because the reproductives and nymphs are concentrated in nests near or below ground level in structures out of reach of these control methods. The primary methods of controlling these termites are the application of insecticides or baiting programs. Insecticides are applied to the soil either in drenches or by injection. Special hazards are involved with applying insecticides the soil around and under buildings and a licensed professional does these procedures best. Some strategies are pre construction, others are post construction treatments. Soil barrier treatments for the entire structure, or use of new technology products for the entire structure may be done. Foundation perimeter treatments are generally considered very efficacious at keeping subterranean termites out of structures. Local treatments are less efficacious. By law, companies must provide you with the following disclosure. Local treatment is not intended to be an entire structure treatment method. If infestations of wood destroying pests extend and exist beyond the area(s) of local treatment, they may not be exterminated.

Recently introduced chemicals (imidaloprid and fipronil) are now available that are less toxic to humans and other mammals than the older insecticides (repellent termiticides) but highly toxic to insects. Both of these insecticides are non repellent to termites and have been shown to be effective in killing termites at low dosage under Californias climatic conditions. Bora Care, a borate, is also effective and registered, as preconstruction treatment, against subterraneans. Generally, the most effective insecticides are only available to licensed structural pest control operators.

Original post:
Power Termite Control | Peeze of Mynd on Termites

If you see any sign of termite damage, it is usually to the point where the destruction will cost hundreds or even thousands of dollars to repair. Instead of finding termite damage, contact the Jacksonville termite control experts at Apex Pest Control to verify the structural integrity of your home. Our trained termite specialists will determine if your home has fallen prey to termites and will recommend the best and safest form of treatment.

A home that has a termite infestation will typically have three to four termite colonies on the property. Each colony contains one million or more termites, and each termite eats two to three percent of its weight in cellulose per day. If your house contains the wood these colonies are eating, the damage can quickly escalate since termite queens lay an egg every 15 seconds. In other words, the ultimate solution is to be proactive in termite control: contact Apex Pest Control.

As newer construction worksites are more prone to these termites, certain treatments should be started early.

Jacksonville receives from 2.5 to 8 of rain every month. Termites depend on damp, humid weather for survival, and the climate along the Atlantic coast is ideal for termite invasions. While new homes are constructed with treated lumber, the older homes and businesses in Jacksonville may be more susceptible to termite damage. Apexs crew of trained Jacksonville termite control professionals can check your homes substructure to determine where and how much termite damage has occurred. If their findings are conclusive, Apex will work with you to quickly eradicate the termite mounds on your property, which aremost likely subterranean and not nearly as interesting as the termite mounds you see in Africa on television, and protect your home for years to come.

Homes under construction benefit from Apexs multi-focus termite plan. We treat the soil before construction begins, treat the wood once the walls and wiring are in place, and can even install PipelineTM, a unique pest control distribution system that allows our technicians to maintain a safe level of pesticides in your home by simply applying the product through a junction box located on your homes exterior. Technicians no longer have to come inside and spray, and the treatment is easily applied even if homeowners are unable to be present for treatment.

Contact Apex Pest Control at (866) 675-4070 for your Jacksonville termite control needs, and read our past blogs for more information on termite prevention and control. Dont let termites take a bite out of your home.

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Jacksonville Termite Control – Apex Pest

Termites Can Be Grouped Into:

Dampwood termites which live in moist, rotting timber

Drywood termites which have no need for soil contact, obtaining moisture from timber

Subterranean termites which are primarily responsible for building damage Australia-wide are ground dwelling, and require contact with soil or a constant source of moisture

Termites are pale brown to white, have beaded antennae and no constriction between the thorax and abdomen. Winged reproductives, (alates) have two pairs of equal sized wings and one pair of compound eyes. Workers and soldiers are blind, sexless and wingless, and have thin cuticles that are susceptible to desiccation in exposed environments. In contrast, ants vary from brown to black, and have an obvious constriction between thorax and abdomen. Their antennae are characteristically elbowed. Ant alates have two pairs of wings of unequal size and one pair of compound eyes. Ant workers, and soldiers have thick cuticles insensitive to desiccation so that they can exist outside the colony.

Termites metamorphose through egg to nymph to adult. By several moults, the young nymphs then differentiate into one of several castes. This may take several months, depending upon food availability, temperature, and the colony’s vigour. Within a termite colony there are several forms (castes); namely a queen, king, workers, soldiers, and periodically, reproductives. Each caste is structurally different with specific functions to perform for the colony’s survival and maintenance.

They are the original winged reproductives (alates) which left the parent colony during the colonising flight. They then shed their wings to seek out a suitable nesting site, mate and establish a new colony. Their function in the colony is reproduction – the queen becomes an egg laying machine of over 1,000 eggs per day. Colonies of different species vary in size from hundreds of thousands to millions of individuals. For destructive species to reach a damaging stage from a single pair usually requires 3 to 5 years, depending on the site, food and immediate climatic conditions.

Both queen and king may live for over 25 years. As the queen ages, her reproductive capacity declines, and the colony may then select supplementary queens (neotenics) from the various developmental stages of reproductives to replace the queen and king. These reproductives never go on a colonising flight.

These numerically dominate the colony since they perform all tasks including gathering food, tending the eggs and feeding the young, building the nest and galleries, repairing damage, and tending and feeding the queen with the exception of defence and reproduction. Workers are responsible for timber damage and construct earthen leads as they search for and excavate timber. They are wingless, blind and sterile, and have thin cuticles or body covering making them susceptible to desiccation outside the colony. Older workers may predominate in activities outside the nest. Workers leave the security of the colony via underground tunnels and shelter tubes only when the humidity is high. In some species, larvae develop into workers or nymphs. These workers may then develop into soldiers and the nymphs may become alates. In other species, the worker caste remains as workers throughout their developmental stages.

In some species there is no true worker caste. The developing nymph moults until it reaches an advanced stage of growth and then does the work of the colony. At this stage it can continue to feed and moult without differentiation or moult to a pre-soldier and then soldier; moult to a reproductive nymph with wing buds and then to an alate or form reproductives in the same colony. Other species do not have such a versatile nymphal stage, but have distinct workers, soldiers and reproductives determined very early in their nymphal development.

The soldier caste is the easiest from which to identify the species. They tend to be abundant where there is a large central colony. Like workers, they are wingless, sterile and blind. However, they are usually darker in colour and are distinguished from other castes by their heavily armoured and pigmented heads. Because their mandibles are so specialised, they must be fed by workers. Soldiers are also susceptible to desiccation and seldom leave the environmental security of the colony and shelter tubes.

Mandibulate with obvious, large jaws

Nasute with a large head that tapers abruptly to a point

In some termites, two size classes of soldiers may be present i.e. majors and minors. These often differ in physical characteristics as well, and the numbers of each vary as colonies age.

Several species have a frontal gland that discharges a secretion through a pore in the front of their head. This secretion is associated with defence, being repellent to ants and other enemies. The colour and nature of this secretion are sometimes characteristic of the termite species aiding in identification. The soldier’s role is solely defence of the colony with their large heads, jaws and chemical secretion.

During the colonising flight fully winged reproductives leave the colony annually through “blow holes” or “flight cuts” when external temperature and humidity approximate conditions inside the colony, often before or after a storm usually in the warmer months of November and December. After the flight, the tree calluses over these slits. Because alates do not fly strongly, their dispersal is assisted by winds. They normally swarm at dusk and are attracted to light. Swarming termites are a sure danger sign that a mature termite colony nest is close by. In some species, new colonies are established without a colonising flight. These reproductives mate and produce young, developing large colonies.

Most termite species feed on leaves, bark, and grass, the attractiveness of which is improved by decay. Termites of economic importance eat cellulose, starches, and sugars obtained from wood. Contrary to popular belief, termites are fussy eaters. They do not attack all wood and the wood that is attacked is not attacked equally. Different timber species have varying resistance to termite attack due to the palatability of the timber, the presence of distasteful chemicals in the wood or the wood density which slows the speed at which termites can chew it. Sapwood is preferred to heartwood as the latter has less food value, is more durable and may include toxins. Only a small number of termite species eat sound wood but no timber is “termite proof”.

Termites obtain their protein from fungi growing in or on wood in moist conditions, particularly where ventilation is poor and humidity is high. Many termites have tiny single-celled protozoa in their intestinal tract. They produce an enzyme that digests cellulose which is essential in the conversion of cellulose to soluble sugars. Other species have intestinal bacteria. Both protozoa and bacteria contain nitrogen so that by disposing of excess, dead and diseased members of the colony by cannibalism, termites are able to conserve nitrogen. Bacteria or protozoa are also transferred from termite to termite via feeding and grooming.

Most subterranean termites forage for food by means of galleries usually in the top 20 cm of soil or shelter tubes extending from the central nest. This gallery system may exploit food sources over as much as a hectare with individual galleries extending up to 50 meters, depending upon the species, soil type, available
food sources, and moisture content. Usually only workers and soldiers visit the feeding sites – the other castes remain in the nest. Foraging activity is seasonal, slowing in winter. Although exploratory foraging is thought to be at random, termites tend to aggregate in warm, moist areas containing susceptible timber.

Being susceptible to desiccation, termites require a continual supply of moisture and maintain their nests at nearly 100% humidity. They use moisture from the soil to maintain the colony’s humidity and evaporation to regulate its temperature between 25C and 36C, depending upon the species and prevailing weather conditions.

Subterranean termites can survive without soil contact, but must have an assured and constant moisture supply. Termites favour decaying wood in moist situations within which to establish colonies as it provides them with protein and moisture.

Nests built by workers are often characteristic of the species, aiding in identification when considered with features of the soldier caste. Nests may be ground mounds of various shapes and sizes; tree or arboreal structures; subterranean colonies in the soil; or small colonies in dry wood, trunks and branches of trees. Species which have subterranean habits may nest inside living trees and dead stumps, under verandahs, or concrete slabs.

Thesemay be of various shapes from tall upright mounds to more robust, smaller mounds to low dome-shaped mounds with an internal and external structure characteristic of the species. The outer layers protect the softer, often papery, inner central nursery area which houses the queen and developing nymphs. Mound-forming species attack timber in the ground by making tunnels through the soil radiating from the colony.

Thesehave ground contact usually through the root crown of the tree. They are often large, occasionally attaining heights exceeding 20 meters. By subterranean tunnels and shelter tubes, they attack decaying weathered timber and may be capable of doing considerable damage in a very short time to buildings within at least 50 meter radius of the tree.

Many species have colonies below ground surface created when building covers tree stumps, roots and waste timber providing decaying wood in a moist situation, often under verandahs and in-fill used under bathrooms.

Existence of these colonies is often very difficult to detect. However, these colonies may be capable of doing considerable damage within months to buildings within at least 50 meter radius of the tree.

Single-site nesterse.g. Drywood and Dampwood termites cannot burrow through the soil and live their entire lives inside a single piece of wood.

Multi-site nesterse.g.Heterotermes sp, Schedorhinotermes spandMicrocerotermes spburrow through soil to find food. They may establish or bud off new nests if they locate a large food source.

Central-site nesterse.g.Coptotermesspalso burrow through the soil, but they always transport food back to their original nest which is very large and complex.

Multi-site and in particular, central-site nesting termites show seasonal foraging patterns. Foraging is greatest in warmer, summer months and least in cooler winter months. This pattern varies with the distance from the nest so that foraging is higher in feeding sites further from the nest in summer and lower in sites closer to the nest and the converse for winter. Similarly, there are daily foraging patterns. Foraging activity is highest at the warmest time of the day and lowest at the coolest time of the day especially in winter with forager numbers peaking in the middle of the day. In summer there is a drop in numbers, especially for central-site nesters around the middle of the day.

Termites do not have a clearly delineated territory in which they operate. It is not unusual to find two colonies feeding in the same piece of timber due to colony overlap which explains why active termites may reoccur within previously infested galleries a few months after a colony has been eliminated.

Termites like to travel along predetermined tracks along environmental gradients; they prefer to traverse through damp or warm soil following clues from soil micro-organisms. They randomly forage for a larger food source they can frequently return to.

Many people refer to finding “nests” in cavity walls although this is rare. To be considered a termite nest there needs to be a reproductive pair present, eggs, nymphs, and reproductives. Instead, these areas of intense mudding in cavity walls are really food stores, resting points or bivouacs. Termites may consume food at this point but they are more likely to seal it off and leave it as a future food store.

Concealment is the primary way termites defend themselves because they have weak, soft exoskeletons and short legs. Termite mud tubes allow them to move safely between places. Soldiers are the secondary defence mechanism of the colony, fending off invaders long enough for the workers to wall off the part of the colony being attacked, sacrificing soldiers in the process. Because of these weaknesses, termites normally avoid areas that are in constant use. In the case of most termite dust toxicants, the colony can detect the presence of the toxin and seal off that part of the colony, effectively sacrificing themselves so that the nest survives. This is why dust treatment often gives short term success with termites appearing again a few months later. When faced with a threat, termites send out a warning signal to the rest of the colony by convulsing, banging their heads and producing vibrations that the rest of the colony interprets as a signal to evacuate.

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Termite Life Cycle & Behaviour | Australian Building …

If you have a termite question not on this page, please call 1300 69 59 49 and one of our friendly staff will help you.

A. Most home owners only find out they have termite damage when the damage is severe and their foot goes through the floor or a door falls off its jamb. The short answer, particularly if you live in a termite susceptible area, is to have the home inspected by a termite technician every 12 months.

A. It is tempting to try and undertake your own inspection but in virtually all cases when when this is done by the client the extent of the termite damage is not discovered, the damage misdiagnosed, and species located not understood. This inevitably delays the client from contacting a professional and thus the client sustains further damage to the building.

Our industry has set standards the dictate how an inspection is to be conducted by licensed pest operators. It takes a lot of training and thousands of dollars of equipment to undertake a proper inspection, which will still need to be conducted even if you do locate some termite activity before any proper treatment is undertaken.

So honestly, if you have a suspected issue or your area is known to have termites just give us a call and let us help you; youll be glad you did.

A. A white ant is an Australian name for a termite so when someone refers to white ants they are referring to the same insect as termites. However, this colloquial term is misleading as termites have no relation to ants, are a completely separate species and are instead closely related to wood cockroaches. But if someone is referring to a white ant treatment, it is no different to that of termite treatment.

A. Termite sprays and termite baits are used for entirely different purposes, but both have a valuable role in the control of termites.

If a building is infested by termites, the first thing to do is have a professional termite inspection. The second thing to do is to kill the termite colony that is infesting the building. This does not mean just killing a few termites that you can detect in a building, it means destroying the entire termite colony including the termite Queen (or Queens) who lays all the eggs. The nest could be as far away as 75 metres from your building.

A termite baiting system in skilled hands is an excellent method of termite colony control. A termite chemical soil treatment does not achieve colony control, is not intended for this purpose (despite the misleading and unsubstantiated claims of some chemical suppliers).

Once termite colony control has been achieved, and some evidence to support this has been recorded, then a protective termite treatment should be applied. A termite spray (soil treatment) can be an excellent way of doing this, provided the building can be accessed in all areas. If the structure of a building does not lend itself to termite spray treatment, perhaps because of lack of access under a floor, then a termite monitoring system can be an effective alternative method of termite protection into the future.

Termite nest being destroyed by a specialist

A. Opinions may vary, however the opinion of our termite specialists is very clear NO. The main thing that affects termite pressure on a home is the presence or absence of a termite colony nest near your home. If a termite nest is located in a tree on your property, it is likely that our technicians will be able to find it and destroy it without cutting down any trees.

In fact, cutting down trees may reduce the foraging area for termites without getting rid of the actual termite colony nest and this wont reduce the risk from termites to your home.

A. We recommend that you invite three pest companies to offer you advice and provide you with a free treatment proposal. Its important to select companies that are local to you because most termite work involves repeat visits and check-ups.

You could also ask friends and neighbours or the local council for a referral to a local trusted company.

Any companies you ask to come out and look at your property should be able to provide the following:

A Pest cert is a new system of industry self regulation currently being rolled out. The standards required for running a Pest cert business are high, and if you select a company who has achieved this, then you can be sure that the company is well managed.

In addition, with termite work it is not enough just for the company to be insured. Each individual operator should have accreditation with their insurance company specifically to do termite work and termite inspections. This is not easy to get, and typically requires two years shoulder to shoulder supervised experience with termite work and 40 supervised termite inspections. Once they demonstrate to insurance company that they have the required experience, the operator is given an individual insurance accreditation number.

If your termite technician can provide to you such a number (which should be written on his paper work), you can be sure they are well qualified for the job. This accreditation is much harder to get than a license, and you should be choosy and select only from those that provide you with an insurance accreditation number.

Its also important to remember that termite work is very different for general pest control. It needs experience to have the wisdom and confidence to give clients clear and balanced advice, and skilled treatments. Sometimes tough and expensive decisions need to be made about re-detailing buildings or landscaping in the longer term interest of the client. Dont ask a general pest controller to do this ask a termite specialist.

A. You can reduce the risk yourself by obtaining expert advice. Call a termite specialist and request a free advisory meeting. It is likely that you will be advised to have some kind of protective treatment, but you should also be given advice about how your home can be re-detailed so as to reduce the risk. This can really make a difference.

Typically, in an average home in Melbourne, we find the following conducive conditions which, if fixed, will reduce the termite risk:

A high finished ground level (FGL) is by far the most common fault and greatly increases the termite risk. As a guide, your FGL should be about 150mm below your floor level. You should step UP into your home. For homes on slabs, this usually means that the slab edge is just covered but the weep holes are free of garden beds. For homes on timber floors, this usually means that the air vents become free and the sub-floor can breathe.

A sleeper retaining wall provide nesting harbourage ideal for termites. If you have one just a few metres from your home, you should consider removing it.

A high proportion of the infestations we attend are caused by inappropriate add-ons to buildings. The main offenders are new concrete slabs poured against existing timber floors, and garages and underfloor basements converted to living areas.

Never combine timber floors with concrete slabs and always show your plans to a termite specialist before you build.

Remember, termites require water to maintain the high humidity within the nest in addition to food, or wood. By removing these needs homeowners can do their part to prevent these pests from becoming a problem in th
eir home.

You can do this by:

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Frequently Asked Questions – Specialist Termite Control

Termites are social insects. These insects live in colonies governed by acaste systems. All three castes differ dramatically in appearance and responsibilities.

Workers Worker termites are the most numerous and most destructive members. They can be foundinfesting walls or floor joists of a home. They are white in appearance and navigate with their antennae rather than their eyes: worker termites are blind. This caste of termites is responsible for bringing food back to the colony, caring for the other castes and constructing the galleries and tunnels that form the physical colony. Subterranean worker termites use a mixture of mud, saliva and feces to create mud tunnels to and from sources of food.

Soldiers Soldier termites are pale yellow-brown in color and have enlarged heads and mandibles. The soldier castes enlarged jaws prevent them from feeding themselves, and they rely upon workers to assist them in this task. The sole function of the warrior termite caste is to defend the colony from attacks. These warriors will occasionally attack other termite colonies, although the primary threat to any termite colony isants.

Reproductive termites are an integral piece of the colonys structure. Young reproductive termites, also referred to as alates, are black and winged. When outdoor humidity and moisturelevels arecorrect, both male and female reproductive termites participate in mating swarms, after which they land and shed their wings. These insects then go on to form new colonies, within which they will be reproductive kings and queens.

Formosan Termite Colony Nest:

Termite Life Cycle

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Termite Colony: Structure of Termite Colonies

If queen and king termites meet, they will crawl away and dig a hole, never to see daylight again. The two will mate and produce a new colony. A termite queen will live deep in the colony and produce up to 165 million eggs in her lifetime or about one egg every 3 seconds for 15 years. The queen develops a distended body that starts out perhaps the length of a dime and may reach the size of a human index finger.

Worker termites construct the colony and tunnels, while the king will remain in a capsule with the queen. As infant termites are born, they feed and clean the queen, while she exudes a liquid they consume. Workers carry away the eggs, stack them and tend to them until the hatch.

When the queen dies, the termites abandon the colony and it may die out, or it may be repopulated by her offspring and the young queens she has sent out.

There is often more than one queen in a colony, although there is a primary queen. The queen is the source of the pheromones for the colony, which is how they communicate. If cared for well by the colony, a termite queen may live up to 50 years. Until the queen is killed, it is impossible to completely eradicate a colony in Owensville, TX.

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Queen Termites in Owensville, TX – localtermiteinspectors.com

Termites are very long-lived, particularly queen termites. While the queens have an average life expectancy of 15 years, studies have found they can live up to 50 years in the perfect climate conditions and if they are well cared for in Owensville, TX. Soldiers, which defend the colony, and workers, who take care of other termites and built the tunnels, live about one to two years because they are highly active. Swarming alates, or the primary reproductive termites, have a low survival rate as they are often eaten by ants and birds once they leave the colony. They are also very poor flyers and mostly rely on the wind, which means many do not establish a new colony.

Termite colonies themselves are even longer-lived. A colony will live as long as the primary queen and then longer. By the time the queen dies, the colony may be very large. Some remote colonies can stretch for acres with a population of one million or more. In some areas, there are more than 20 termite colonies per acre, according to researchers. While the termite queen may die off, termites will create satellite colonies in Owensville, TX and other colony queens will continue reproducing.

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Termite Life Expectancy in Owensville, TX